PUBLICATIONS
O. Peter Snyder, Jr., Ph.D.

updated April 2010
for PDF version, click here

BOOK ENTRIES
REFEREED AND PROFESSIONAL JOURNALS
INDUSTRY PUBLICATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PUBLICATIONS
MILITARY PUBLICATIONS
HITM PUBLICATIONS
HITM WEBSITE ARTICLES
TEXTS
PRESENTATIONS

BOOK ENTRIES


REFEREED AND PROFESSIONAL JOURNALS

    ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION:


INDUSTRY PUBLICATIONS

  • Snyder, O.P.  1975.  The real truth about microwave oven safety.  In Microwave Proceedings.  Twin Cities Home Economists in Business.  Minneapolis, MN.  63-69.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1976.  Increasing the quality of vegetables in food service operations.  Microwave Energy Applications Newsletter.  9(2): 3-7.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1978.  Food away from home: Restaurants, concessions and catering.  In Proceedings MN Governor's Conference of Food and Nutrition.  St. Paul, MN
  • Snyder, O.P.  1979.  QA standards and sanitation regulations.  MN Environ. Health Assoc. Newsletter.  9(1): 1-10.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1980.  The microwave in maintaining nutrients.  Microwave World.  1(5): 16.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1981.  Institutional ovens, the microwave future.  Microwave World.  2(1): 15.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1981.  New opportunities for microwave ovens in foodservice.  Hospitality Scene.  1(7): 23-24.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1981.  Quality assurance standards, the key to increased profits in the 80's.  Hospitality Scene.  1(8): 4-5, 18-19.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Cooling food and washing tableware.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(4).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  European foodservice kitchens are different.  Hospitality Scene.  2(4): 18-21.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Hot, freshly prepared vegetables, a profit margin builder.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(2).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Leadership in developing your foodservice employees.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(8).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Light cuisine and the restaurants of the 80's.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(9).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Prevent foodborne illness: Safe by choice -- not chance.  Hospitality Scene.  2(9): 17-19.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Profits by plan, not chance.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(7).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Progressive cooking of soup.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(5).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Restaurant survival and growth in the 80's.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(6).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  The safety and hazards of some acid foods.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(3).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Self regulation, a critical success factor.  Hospitality Scene.  2(10): 17-18.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Coaching for improved work performance.  The Restaurant Shopper.  2(3).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Design choices, base them on your menu.  Hospitality Scene.  3(2): 9-11.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Estouffade: Secrets of a good stock.  Hospitality Scene.  3(5): 6-7.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Handwashing: How to prevent foodborne illness.  Hospitality Scene.  3(1): 27-29.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  The Hospitality Institute of Technology and Management.  The Restaurant Shopper.  1(11).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Make the customer feel at home: Record of an interview with Michael Ayala.  Hospitality Scene.  3(8): 4-6.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Quality is free: It's the mistakes that cost.  Hospitality Scene.  3(6): 7.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  The real causes of foodborne illness outbreaks.  The Restaurant Shopper.  2(1).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  The restaurant manager's inspection check list.  The Restaurant Shopper.  2(2).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Seafood: Maintaining a quality product.  Hospitality Scene.  3(7): 3-5.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Vegetables selection, care and handling.  Hospitality Scene.  3(4): 3-4.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Truth-in-menu guidelines.  The Restaurant Shopper.  2(7).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Dishwashing machine maintenance.  Hospitality Scene.  4(7): 8-9.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Frozen food technology.  Hospitality Scene.  4(10): 11-12.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Housekeeping and microbiological safety.  Hospitality Scene.  4(3): 7-8, 24.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Microwave food heating.  Hospitality Scene.  4(3): 3, 19.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Progressive casserole recipe (preparation in institutional foodservice).  Hospitality Scene.  4(6): 21-24.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Adequate food cooking, the key to foodborne illness prevention.  The Restaurant Shopper.  (March).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1985.  Assuring quality.  Hospitality Scene.  5(2): 22-23.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1985.  Foodborne illness: An industry task force could develop a model voluntary foodborne illness prevention code.  Hospitality Scene.  5(1): 34.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1985.  Microwave systems.  Hospitality Scene.  5(3): 10-15.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1986.  Microwave ovens.  Hospitality Scene.  6(2): 7-8.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1986.  Quality assurance: Reducing dram shop insurance rates through quality assurance.  Hospitality Scene.  5(9): 11-12.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1987.  How well do you delegate?.  Today's Restaurant Manager.  (September).
  • Snyder, O.P.  1990.  Employee motivation to achieve quality-assured performance.  Foodservice News.  1(2): 7.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1990.  Foodborne illness: A national government disgrace.  Nation’s Rest. News.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1990.  Foodborne illness is no mystery.  Foodservice News.  1(1): 14.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1990.  Implementing motivational procedures to achieve quality-assured performance.  Foodservice News.  1(3): 5.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1990.  Training for excellence in employee performance.  Foodservice News.  1(5): 5.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1990.  Who is really responsible for foodservice foodborne illness?  Foodservice News.  1(4): 5.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Competitive excellence through quality assurance management.  Foodservice News.  2(2): 7, 9-10.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Food hazard control in food operations.  Foodservice News.  2(12): 10-11.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Food safety: The microbiological, chemical and hard foreign objects hazards.  Trade Talk.  5(4): 6, 26, 38.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Food safety self-control certification.  Foodservice News.  2(1): 5.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Government inspection program: Industry entrapment program.  Foodservice News.  2(6): 6.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  The government's eye on safety.  Foodservice News.  2(8): A8-A9.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Mandatory manager education in St. Paul.  Foodservice News.  2(3): 12.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Minnesota enforcement of refrigeration requirements.  Foodservice News.  2(9): A12-A13.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Planning for the use of blast chillers in foodservice operations.  Micro Messenger.  3M.  St. Paul, MN
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  St. Paul revises ordinance for food handler training and certification.  Foodservice News.  2(5): 10-11.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  A checklist for a safe and quality assured food operation.  Foodservice News.  3(8): 12-13.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  A checklist for a safe and quality assured food operation (cont).  Foodservice News.  3(9): 12
  • Snyder, O.P. 1992.  Developing a profitable salad bar.  Pizza Today.  (November).  46, 48-51.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Food contact surface sampling: Controlling for zero process defects.  Micro Messenger.  3M.  (July).  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Food quality improvement program report.  Foodservice News.  3(5): 8-9.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Implementing a HACCP program.  Trade Talk.  5(6): 16, 24, 28.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Minnesota food quality assurance council.  Foodservice News.  3(4): 6.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Minnesota Health Department refrigeration standards.  Foodservice News.  3(2): A12, A14-A15.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  More problems with foodservice gloves.  Foodservice News.  3(3): A6-A7.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Problems with MSG.  Foodservice News.  3(6): 6-7.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Sous vide certification Foodservice News.  3(1): 10-11.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  The technology of hazard control.  Trade Talk.  5(5): 6, 16, 32-33.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Ramsey County HACCP-AWAIR food safety demonstration program.  Foodservice News.  4(4): 18.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1998.  Retail HACCP:  Food operation self-control.  Food Quality.  5(3): 20-21.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1998.  Retail HACCP:  Implementing your HACCP-based quality program.  Food Quality.  5(5): 18-19.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1998.  Retail HACCP:  The food safety problem.  Food Quality.  5(1): 14-15.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1998.  Retail HACCP:  To control your system, first specify its components.  Food Quality.  5(7): 18-19.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1999.  Retail HACCP:  GMPs:  The foundation for self-control.  Food Quality.  6(1): 20-21.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1999.  Retail HACCP:  Recipe HACCP Part I:  Setting time-temperature Rules.  Food Quality.  6(5): 20-22.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1999.  Retail HACCP:  Recipe HACCP Part II:  Block-flow diagramming recipes.  Food Quality.  6(7): 34-35, 37-38.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2000.  Retail HACCP:  Variations on recipe block-flow diagrams.  Food Quality.  7(2): 18-21.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2000.  Retail HACCP:  Why we need HACCP in retail food operations.  Food Quality.  7(4):21-22.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2000.  Retail HACCP:  HACCP prerequisites are the foundation for safe food.  Food Quality.  7(6):14-16.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2000.  Why room temperature thawing is safe:  Commentary.  Food Protect. Report.  16(2): 2A.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2001.  Why gloves are not the solution to the fingertip washing problem.  Commentary.  Food Protect. Report.  17(4):8, 10.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2002.  HACCP self-regulation and active managerial control.  Food Safety Prof.  1(3):15-17.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2002.  Industry self-regulation using HACCP.  Food Safety Prof.  1(1):14-15.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2003.  AMC: A no-risk dining opportunity.  Food Safety Prof.  1(4):19-21.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2003.  AMC in operation.  Food Safety Prof.  2(1):17-20.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2003.  Choosing the right thermometer.  Food Safety Prof.  2(2):7-12.
  • Snyder, O.P., Gold, J.I., and Olsen, K.A.  1979.  Analysis of kitchen design parameters for five hospital food service systems in the United States.  Final Report.  S. Yasufuku.  Nishinomiya.  Hyogo, Japan.  133.
  • Snyder, O.P., Gold, J.I., and Olsen, K.A.  1979.  Analysis of kitchen design parameters for five hospital food service systems in the United States.  Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd.  Tokyo, Japan.
  • Snyder, O.P. and Schowalter, C.  1981.  Serving top--quality fish and seafood.  Hospitality Scene.  1(8): 22, 24.
  •  Snyder, O.P.  2006.  New recipe development: Using HACCP to assure safety.  Culinology Currents.  Winter:6, 16.  http://www.culinology.org/files/Culinology_Currents_2006-Winter.pdf.

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    UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PUBLICATIONS

     
  • Himmelfarb, B.S. and Snyder, O.P. 1978. Truth-in-menu-guidelines. U. of MN Agric. Ext. Serv. Ext. Folder 400-1978. St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1974. A mini food service sanitation program every food service needs. MN Tourist Travel Notes. 12(3): 3.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1975. Power consumption in cooking meals with a conventional range as compared with a combination range having microwave power along with thermal energy in the oven. Final Report Memo of Agreement No. 0662-5743-02. U of MN. St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1978. How to write a quality assurance policy manual. U. of MN Agric. Ext. QA Prog. St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1980. Preventing foodborne illness -- A quality assurance program for food service operation. 3rd ed. U of MN Agric. Ext. Special Report 61. St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. and Minke, M. 1975. Real-time computer guidance of food service operation. Project Report No. 1. Project No. 18-030. Dept. Food Sci. and Nutrition. U of MN. St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. and Minke, M. 1975. Real-time computer guidance of food service operation. Project Report No. 2. Project No. 18-030. Dept. Food Sci. and Nutrition. U of MN. St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P., Thompson, D.R., and Norwig, J.F. 1983. Comparative gas/electric food service equipment energy consumption ratio study. Dept. Food Sci. and Nutrition. U. of MN. St. Paul, MN.

  •  


    MILITARY PUBLICATIONS

  • El-Bisi, H.M., Snyder, O.P., and Leven, R.E. 1966. Radiation death kinetics of Clostridium botulinum spores at cryogenic temperatures. Presented at the International Symposium on Botulism. XIth International Congress for Microbiology. Moscow, USSR.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1960. The design of a low level food radioactivity detector. QM Food and Container Inst. Report No. 20-60, QMC-USA. Chicago, IL.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1960. Low temperature irradiation of foods, an evaluation. QM Food and Container Inst. Report No. 23-60, QMC-USA. Chicago, IL.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1962. Assembly and operation of the wide temperature irradiation system. QM Food and Container Inst. Report No. 26-62, QMC-USA. Chicago, IL.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1962. Gamma and electron radiation measuring devices for the QMRL. QM Food and Container Inst. Report No. 22-62, QMC-USA. Chicago, IL.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1966. Food radiation 1966, the process engineering challenge. Presented at the 59th Annual Meeting. Amer. Soc. of Agric. Engineers. Amherst, MA.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1967. Automation of repair parts handling for the field army. Presented to the Command and General Staff College. Fort Leavenworth, KS.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1971. Credit card warehouse. Army Logistician. (January-February). 30-34.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1972. The automation of fixed and in-transit inventory data. U.S. Army Logistics Management Center Doc. No. 50025. UASLMC. Fort Lee, VA.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1972. Introduction to decision tables. U.S. Army Logistics Management Center Doc. No. 513014. UASLMC. Fort Lee, VA.
  • Snyder, O.P. 1972. Management information system (MIS) design. U.S. Army Logistics Management Center Doc. No. 5114007 UASLMC. Fort Lee, VA.

  •  


    HOSPITALITY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT PUBLICATIONS

  • Jung, M., Stomberg, L, Redondo Fernandez, S., Crespo, I, and Snyder, O.P.  1995.  A food safety survey of eleven foodservice operations in the Minneapolis / St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Poland, D.M. and Snyder, OP.  1993.  Food allergy and sensitivity: A retail food hazard problem.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Rivituso, C.P. and Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Controlling food bacterial populations in foodservice operations.  HITM QA Tech Brief 8.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1982.  Food safety quality assurance for food service employees.  2nd ed.  HITM Serv. Special Report 59.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  A customer's view of what makes up a quality dining experience.  HITM Tech Brief 11.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Everyone is a manager.  HITM Tech Brief 16.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  A management quality assurance system for making foodservice customer satisfaction certain.  HITM Tech Brief 6.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Oxidative rancidity fact sheet.  HITM Tech Brief 9.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1983.  Quality attributes and quality retention.  HITM QA Tech Brief 12.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Appraising and developing managers.  HITM Tech Brief 4.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Foodservice hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) in the fecal-human contamination cycle.  HITM QA Tech Brief 1.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Foodborne illness prevention work performance objectives for foodservice employees and managers.  HITM QA Tech Brief 10.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Foodservice QA glossary.  HITM Tech Brief 2.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Leadership in hospitality operations.  HITM QA Tech Brief 3.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Management's role in developing food service employees.  HITM QA Tech Brief 5.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  Operator / manager course, preventing foodborne illness in foodservice operations.  HITM Fdsv 1901.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1984.  1984.  Quality management team (QMT) facilitator training course.  HITM Exec 2401.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1989.  Elements of a good legal defense.  HITM Tech Bull.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1989.  Employee motivation to achieve quality-assured performance.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1990.  Concept of operator self-control.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Foodservice fly control.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  HACCP in the retail food industry.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Safety-assured chilled food systems.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1991.  Upgrading the performance of U.S. foodservice refrigerators and freezers.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Components of a HACCP-based TQM foodservice program.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Food safety management plan.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Foodborne illness hazard control strategies for churches and non-regulated group feeding situations.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  General principles of liability in hazard analysis and control.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  HACCP-based Total Quality Management system documentation and certification.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  How to manage more effectively.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Implementing a Total Quality Management program.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Manager behaviors important in employee improvement.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1992.  Manager responsibilities for competitive excellence in foodservice.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Company Total Quality Management (TQM).  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Customer and employee physical hazard analysis and control policies, procedures, and standards.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Developing a total quality management-based food safety program for a chilled food system.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Foodborne illness hazards and control policies, procedures, and standards for pasteurized and chilled food systems.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  HACCP-based food safety self-control -- An overview.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  The hazard control base for zero-liability food operation total quality management.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Implementing HACCP.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Leadership development.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Mandatory safety requirements for self-control.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Microbiological process validation in cook (pasteurized) chilled food inventory systems.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Restaurant kitchen food hot holding table: water evaporation in food pans.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Restaurant refrigeration performance testing.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Roles individuals play in groups.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1993.  Safe food cooling.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1994.  Cross-contamination of gloves when being put on.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1994.  The evaluation of wooden vs. polyethylene cutting boards using florescent powder.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1994.  Good refrigeration: A critical food operation success factor.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1994.  HITM 10-step Total Quality Management program.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1994.  How to assure safety and quality in your operation.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1994.  Refrigeration.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1995.  Oxidation-reduction potential in standard food products.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN
  • Snyder, O.P.  1995.  Some applications of thermocouples in the home kitchen.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1997.  Hazards of chlorine by-products.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1997.  Safety analysis: Butter.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. (Ed.) and contributing authors.  1991-present.  QA Report.  1(1)-(12); 2(1)-(2).  Ongoing newsletter publication from HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. and Dickinson, L.J.  1985.  Employee team management and coaching.  HITM Exec 1302.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P., Dickinson, L.J., and Boekhoff, P.M.  1984.  Foodservice occupational safety.  HITM Fdsv 1905.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P., Edgren, A.R., Thomas, C.P., and Boekhoff, P.M.  1984.  Nutrition for commercial recipe design: Keeping healthy people healthy.  HITM Fdsv 1202.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. and Himmelfarb, B.S.  1983.  Truth in menu.  HITM Tech Brief 14.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. and McDill, L.A.  1985.  Kitchen management.  HITM Fdsv 1201.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P., Nelson, M.J., and Dickinson, L.J.  1984.  Service management course.  HITM Exec 1301.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.and Poland, D.M.  1995.  Food irradiation today.  for Rubbright*Brody, Inc.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P.and Poland, D.M.  1995.  The MSG problem.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. and Rivituso, C.P.  1984.  Foodservice quality assurance standards versus sanitation regulations.  HITM Tech Brief 25.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Snyder, O.P. and Snyder, E.R.  1985.  Responsible beverage service for any city, MN.  HITM.  St. Paul, MN.
  • Swenson, R. and Snyder, O.P.  1994.  The need for total hair restraint in foodservice.  HITM QA Tech Brief 7.  St. Paul, MN.

  • SELECTED ARTICLES FOUND ON HITM WEBSITE, http://www.hi-tm.com

    RETAIL FOOD ALLIANCE: ASSURING RETAIL FOOD EXCELLENCE WORLDWIDE THROUGH INDUSTRY SELF-CONTROL

  • Development and documentation of hazard identification and control procedures for retail food operations
  • Retail food operations HACCP-TQM technical guidelines
  • Process performance standards (Retail food process controls that assure hazards are at a tolerable level)
  • Food pathogen control data summary
  • Retail food operations policies, procedures, and standards manual
  • HACCP-TQM food manufacturing operations manual (table of contents)
  • Applying HACCP to retail food operations – a series of 10 papers

  • HACCP/QA

  • HITM HACCP-based TQM program
  • Modification of NACMCF HACCP with risk management to retail food HACCP-TQM

  • RETAIL FOOD SYSTEM REPORTS

  • Antimicrobial effects of spices and herbs
  • Assuring safety of egg yolk-based sauces and salad dressings
  • The basics of cooling food
  • Causes of foodborne disease
  • Employee food hazard control in retail food operations
  • Food safety hazards and controls for the home food preparer
  • Foodborne illness hazard control strategies for churches and non-regulated group feeding situations
  • Growth of microorganisms in food
  • The menu / recipe section of your retail HACCP operations manual
  • Pasteurized-chilled food process hazard control flow diagram
  • The reduction of E. coli on various countertop surfaces
  • Safety of pasteurized chilled food
  • Some foodborne illness agents
  • What every consumer needs to know about food thermometers
  • Why gloves are not the solution to the fingertip washing problem
  • RETAIL FOOD PROCESSES, THEIR HAZARDS AND CONTROLS

  • Adverse reactions to food, food allergy and sensitivity: A retail food hazard problem
  • Bimetallic coil thermometer: Unsatisfactory for measuring food temperatures
  • Bloody chicken
  • Calculating the total growth of bacteria in cooked food using the FDA code controls
  • Calibrating thermometers in boiling water
  • Cooling food in 6 hours in NSF refrigeration units
  • The dangerous bimetallic coil thermometer
  • Double hand washing with a fingernail brush
  • The effect of water quality on food
  • Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other pathogenic strains of E. coli
  • Food irradiation today
  • Foodservice fly control
  • HACCP and slow -roasting turkeys
  • HITM retail food operations hazards and controls
  • How effective and necessary are sanitizing solutions in retail food operations?
  • Illnesses of viral origin: Is it a cold, the flu, or foodborne illness?
  • The microbiology of cleaning and sanitizing a cutting board
  • The microbiology of dishcloths in the home kitchen
  • The microbiology of food market salad and salad bar items
  • Precooling hot food using kitchen-temperature air
  • Preparing a safe turkey
  • A "Safe Hands" hand wash program for retail food operations
  • A "Safe Hands" hand wash program for retail food operations:  A technical review
  • A summary of research information on why internal meat color should not be used as an indication of meat doneness
  • Sushi rice HACCP & Quality-assured HACCP recipe procedures
  • Thawing at ambient temperature on the counter
  • Which hamburger is safe?


  • HACCP-TQM INFORMATION AND TIPS
  • Freezing bananas
  • Decaffeinating coffee
  • Pickled eggs
  • Three thermometers
  • Elements and components of process safety management

  •  


    COURSES (TEXTS) WRITTEN BY O. P. SNYDER

  • Technology of HACCP-based, Chilled Food Production Systems
  • Developing and Implementing HACCP-based Retail Food Operations
  • Managing Food Hazards in Retail Food Operations
  • Establishing HACCP in Retail Food Operations (Recertification)
  • Preparing Food Safely in Retail Food Operations
  • Employee Food Safety: A Self-Instruction Text
  • Employee Food Hazard Control in Retail Food Operations
  • Foodservice Occupational Safety Manager Certification
  • Kitchen Management
  • Nutrition for Commercial Recipe Design
  • Table Service Management
  • Caring Customer Service
  • Principles of Excellent Table Service for Employees
  • Responsible Beverage Service
  • Employee Development through Performance Appraisal and Counseling
  • Employee Team Management and Coaching
  • Manager Leadership
  • Performance Assurance Management Team Systems
  • Executive Management for Competitive Excellence
  • Food Safety Hazards and Controls for the Home Food Preparer
  • Managing Food Hazards in Retail Food Operations

  • VIDEO

  • Safe hand washing video tape package with written educational material
  • SELECTED PRESENTATIONS TO INDICATE VARIETY OF TOPICS AND AUDIENCES

    1985-1999
    2000-2005 2006-2010

    Dr. Snyder has been a frequent presenter at Institute of Food Technologists and International Association of Food Protection [IAFP; formerly International Association of Milk, Food and Environmental Sanitarians, Inc. (IAMFES)]  annual conferences.  Recent examples are as follows.

    IFT

  • Snyder, O.P.  1996.  Competencies needed by a retail food system process safety certifier.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1996.  International, universal HACCP-based TQM guidelines for retail food safety.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2000.  Microbial Safety of Minimally Process Food (for symposium HACCP Applied to Minimally Processed Food).
  • Snyder, O.P.  2004.  Applying food science to innovate new processes in retail food operations (for symposium Outreach to the hospitality and foodservice industry).
  • Snyder, O.P.  2005.  Food safety principles in developing products for the foodservice market.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2005.  HACCP application and documentation in retail operations.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2006.  Global trends of retail food operations and processes. 
  • Snyder, O.P.  2009.  Science-based retail food process development.  
  •  
     IAMFES / IAFP

  • Juneja, V.K., Marmer, B.S., and Snyder, O.P.  1995.  Thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 in meat.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1996.  The management and technology of retail food system food safety.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1996.  Medical advice and general food safety information for travelers.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1998.  Recipe-based HACCP.
  • Snyder, O.P., and Schaffner, D.  1998.  Risk management of food from farm to fork.
  • Snyder, O.P.  1999.  Integrating FDA fisheries, USDA, FDA Industrial, and FDA retail HACCP into one set of national industry self-control requirements (for symposium HACCP in Retail Operations.)
  • Snyder, O.P.  2002.  Food safety education for chefs.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2002.  Safe cooling of meats and retail foods: An industry perspective.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2003.  Changing the recipe: How to obtain a food code variation.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2004.  Putting food safety solutions into practice: Failures, sucesses, and tools.
  • Snyder, O.P.  2005.  Unification of retail and process HACCP. 
  • Snyder, O.P.  2009.  Science-based retail food process development.   



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