DRAFT
Section 6: Recipe HACCP (Part B)
PART A
  • The Seven Recipe Processes
  • Recipe Flow Charting

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    PART B

  • Example of QA Recipe Flow - Barley Soup

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    PART C

  • Quality-Assured HACCP Recipe Procedures, the Critical Hazard Control Document

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    PART D

  • Beef Stew
  • Beef Stew:  Quality-Assured HACCP Recipe Procedures

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    Example of QA Recipe Flow - Barley Soup
            As previously described, all tasks that are done in the food facility are parts of the seven recipe processes.  Thus, only each of the seven recipe processes for each style of product (thick foods; thin foods; sauces, brews; fruits, vegetables, starches; bread, batters; cold combinations; hot combinations) need to be flow diagrammed.  The processes of each recipe style can be applied to all of the recipes categorized under that style.  The only variable is flavor, which has no relation to HACCP.
            All processes can be divided into pre-preparation (getting ready), preparation (doing), chill-store / transport-holding, serving, and leftovers.  Each process step is numbered so that it can be referenced.  Each step is identified as: O for Operation; I for Inspect; T for Transport; D for Delay; or S for Store.  The object is to have a minimum number of delay steps, only one store step at the end, a minimum number of transport steps, and just enough operating steps, controlled by inspecting steps, to safely produce the product.
            Each block has a brief description of the step.  Since the critical controls in pasteurized food processes are temperature and time, temperature and time are indicated in the block so that by using the microbiological rules, which have been previously described, one can verify that the process is safe.  Conventional computer logic is used in material flow diagramming.  The symbols are used by industrial engineers and to optimize processes.  When two process methods are compared, the one with the fewest operations that gives the desired product, the least amount of transport and delay, only one store step at the end, and adequate inspect steps, is the best process.  Note the inclusion of the inspect step.  This is one of the most important elements of hazard control.  It emphasizes that the process designer and management must also describe precisely how the employee is to check that he or she has performed a step correctly and what standard(s) must be met.
            Figure 6-3 is an example of a quality-assured recipe flow for barley soup.  (If Figure 6-3 does not print properly, click here for separate image.)
     

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